Maybe they’ll help with the North Korea problem. …

The fall from grace of a rising star in China’s Communist Party sheds light on how a reshuffle of the country’s top officials may play out under the leadership of President Xi Jinping later this year.

Sun Zhengcai, 53, the youngest member of the ruling Politburo, was replaced Saturday as party chief of the southwestern metropolis of Chongqing. He is under investigation for violating party regulations, according to four officials with knowledge of the matter.

Good idea.

When life gives you lemons, make bioplastics

From your phone case to airplane windows, polycarbonates are everywhere. Several million tons of polycarbonate are produced every year around the world. However, worries about the dangers of this material are increasing because of the toxicity of its precursors, especially bisphenol-A, a potential carcinogen.

Now, a team of chemists led by Arjan Kleij, ICIQ group leader and ICREA professor, developed a method to produce polycarbonates from limonene and CO2, both abundant and natural products. Besides, limonene is able to replace a dangerous building block currently used in commercial polycarbonates: bisphenol-A (also known as BPA). Although BPA has been repeatedly classified as a safe chemical by American and European agencies, some studies point out that it is a potential endocrine-disruptor, neurotoxic, and carcinogen. Some countries like France, Denmark and Turkey have banned the use of BPA in the production of baby bottles.

Iran Is Not Complying with the Nuclear Deal

And the U.S. should say so. Per the Iran Nuclear Review Act of 2015, the Trump administration is required to certify to Congress every 90 days that Iran is in compliance with the July 2015 nuclear deal (the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA) and that this agreement is in the national-security interests of the United States. The next certification is due on July 17, 2017. It is crucial that the Trump administration, in the next JCPOA certification statement, correct the gross error it made in April, when it certified that Iran was complying with this agreement and that the JCPOA is in the national-security interests of our country. Unfortunately, the administration reportedly might make this same mistake again. The April certification went against Mr. Trump’s accurate statements during the presidential campaign that the JCPOA was one of the worst agreements ever negotiated and that there was clear evidence of Iran’s failing to meet its obligations under the agreement as well as cheating. Although many Trump officials opposed the April certification — and this decision to certify appeared to irritate President Trump — State Department careerists succeeded in convincing Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to agree to certify anyway. Press reports yesterday indicated that President Trump will grudgingly agree to certify Iranian compliance again but could change his mind.

Two things. 1. It’s you. 2. I’m not buying the numbers.

Whose job is it to keep us safe from online harassment?

A new report has found that 41% of Americans have personally experienced online harassment, 66% have seen it directed to others, and 62% consider it a major problem.

The Pew Research Center survey of 4,248 US adults shows that the number has crept up since the center last did a study of this type in 2014. Three years ago, 35% of all adults had experienced some form of online harassment.

Some of the trollery is just part of online life: something we can ignore or shrug off, such as name-calling or attempts to embarrass us.

But nearly one in five Americans – 18% – have been recipients of the truly nasty, be it threats of violence, sustained harassment, sexual harassment or stalking.