So much for freedom of speech.

A psychology professor at the University of Toronto who is protesting a law that would force him to use certain pronouns for transgender and other gender nonconforming individuals says the school is trying to “silence” him.

“The university, yesterday, basically told me to silence myself,” Jordan Peterson told The Daily Signal. “That’s the second warning letter.”
Peterson has been a vocal opponent of a measure before Canada’s Parliament known as C-16, which would amend the nation’s human rights and criminal codes to make it illegal to discriminate based on gender identity and gender expression.

If passed, failure to refer to a person by the preferred pronoun or refusing to hire someone based on gender identity could qualify as discrimination and be punishable by law.

It’s out there …

In North St. Louis, incumbent Penny Hubbard won the 2016 Democratic primary for Missouri’s 78th House District by 90 votes. Her challenger, Bruce Franks Jr., contested the results, citing a lopsided absentee vote tally that heavily favored Hubbard. Franks had carried the in-person vote.

District Judge Rex Burlison determined that a sufficient number of improper absentee ballots had been cast to change the results of the election, and ordered a second election. Franks won the redo by a margin of 1,533 votes.

… going just as planned.

Next year’s health insurance rates for individual policyholders are starting to hit mailboxes, and that’s proving to be painful for some California consumers.

Covered California, the state’s health insurance marketplace created by the federal health law, warned in July that 2017 premiums would go up an average of 13.2 percent, or more than triple the average 4 percent rate increases that consumers have seen since the exchange started offering coverage in 2014.

Still a Catholic nation.

Thousands of people have marched in Paris to call for the repeal of a law allowing gay marriage, six months before France’s next presidential election.

Marchers were also protesting Sunday against the use of assisted reproduction techniques and surrogate mothers to help same-sex couples have babies.

Assisted reproduction is allowed in France only for infertile heterosexual couples and surrogacy is banned.

The group organizing the march presents itself as promoting the traditional family model of “one mother and one father.” It hopes to influenced the debate before the presidential election next year.

None of the major candidates in the election attended the march.

The 2013 law allowing gay marriage exposed deep divisions in French society, prompting big protests for and against such unions.

CO amendment 69 – that’s because it’s never enough.

What supporters say: The existing health care system, those supporting Amendment 69 say, doesn’t do enough to provide equitable access and enables private corporations to charge higher costs in the interest of profit and to the disadvantage of those who are uninsured or unable to cover high deductibles. Supporters also believe health care costs could be more easily controlled and monitored because administration would cost less under ColoradoCare.

What opponents say: Opponents of Amendment 69 say it would damage the economy, in large part because businesses would start leaving the state, or just not coming here in the first place. They also lack confidence in ColoradoCare’s ability to actually expand health care access and reduce costs in the meantime.